Oregon’s Seismic Rehabilitation Grant Program (SRGP) is a competitive grant program that provides state funds for seismic rehabilitation of fire stations, police stations, K-12 schools, community colleges, hospital buildings and other public facilities.

Here at O’Brien, we know that these often-unseen structural improvements pay public safety dividends by increasing building capabilities to resist earthquake forces and reducing risks to Oregonians using critical public buildings. The performance level requirement of SRGP projects is life-safety for the building occupants with continuity of the facilities’ operations as an essential consideration. The requirement of these emergency services building improvements is immediate occupancy for continued operation of such facilities following a seismic event here in Oregon.

Our build team has completed and is currently working on several seismic rehabilitations for Oregon educational facilities and fire departments funded under the SRGP. To date, our SRGP projects have been delivered as O’Brien CM/GC projects, with negotiated GMP’s.

As an organization focused on continuous improvement, here are some lessons learned on our SRGP-funded projects:

  • Bring open communication, transparency, and collaboration to the project owner and entire team.
  • Work effectively with structural engineers serving as the prime consultant to help make team decisions that maximize project value in both first costs and lifecycle costs.
  • Creatively employ the SRGP scope and budget to achieve added value and to help our clients meet other goals for their facilities.
  • Prioritize community communication and safety in buildings that serve year-round public functions, and are at least partially occupied during construction.

O’Brien’s build team members have expressed interest and enthusiasm for working on more SRGP projects in 2024 and beyond. We are excited to report that we are actively tracking and will be pursuing several more 2024 SRGP projects in our various office locations here in Oregon.



Oregon’s Seismic Rehabilitation Grant Program (SRGP) is a competitive grant program that provides state funds for seismic rehabilitation of fire stations, police stations, K-12 schools, community colleges, hospital buildings and other public facilities.

Here at O’Brien, we know that these often-unseen structural improvements pay public safety dividends by increasing building capabilities to resist earthquake forces and reducing risks to Oregonians using critical public buildings. The performance level requirement of SRGP projects is life-safety for the building occupants with continuity of the facilities’ operations as an essential consideration. The requirement of these emergency services building improvements is immediate occupancy for continued operation of such facilities following a seismic event here in Oregon.

Our build team has completed and is currently working on several seismic rehabilitations for Oregon educational facilities and fire departments funded under the SRGP. To date, our SRGP projects have been delivered as O’Brien CM/GC projects, with negotiated GMP’s.

As an organization focused on continuous improvement, here are some lessons learned on our SRGP-funded projects:

  • Bring open communication, transparency, and collaboration to the project owner and entire team.
  • Work effectively with structural engineers serving as the prime consultant to help make team decisions that maximize project value in both first costs and lifecycle costs.
  • Creatively employ the SRGP scope and budget to achieve added value and to help our clients meet other goals for their facilities.
  • Prioritize community communication and safety in buildings that serve year-round public functions, and are at least partially occupied during construction.

O’Brien’s build team members have expressed interest and enthusiasm for working on more SRGP projects in 2024 and beyond. We are excited to report that we are actively tracking and will be pursuing several more 2024 SRGP projects in our various office locations here in Oregon.