“The construction industry will need to attract an estimated 501,000 additional workers on top of the normal pace of hiring in 2024 to meet the demand for labor, according to a proprietary model developed by Associated Builders and Contractors. In 2025, the industry will need to bring in nearly 454,000 new workers on top of normal hiring to meet industry demand, and that’s presuming that construction spending growth slows significantly next year.”

Source: ABC: 2024 Construction Workforce Shortage Tops Half a Million

Nestucca CTE Work Station

At O’Brien, we’re not waiting for other people to solve this sticky problem.

We are proactively partnering with coastal K-12 schools and with Tillamook Bay Community College (TBCC) for workforce development and job training on the Oregon Coast by:

  • Building, outfitting, and helping to teach students at the new award-winning Nestucca Career Technical Education (CTE) Training Facility with Nestucca Valley School District. Click here to read about the June 2024 Oregon DJC Top Projects Award won by this exciting new CTE facility.
  • Partnering with TBCC to help provide distance learning across all Oregon Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee (OCJATC) jurisdictions. OCJATC and O’Brien provide training as an approved Registered Apprenticeship program, regulated by the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI).

And the results are happening now as:

  • O’Brien’s current apprentices, Andrew Adams and James Callister, have just completed their academic year in the program and are working on O’Brien’s coast projects.
  • TBCC recently announced its first award of 36 national portable credentials to twelve Pre-Apprentices from Nestucca Valley High School. In addition, a total of 14 hours of aligned Dual Credit will be awarded to each pre-apprentice.

We extend our heartfelt congratulations to the entire team for their dedication and hard work in making these achievements possible. The goal of building a skilled workforce for the future is well underway thanks to our partners at Nestucca Valley School District and Tillamook Bay Community College and the contributions of our O’Brien team members!

Nestucca CTE interior
Nestucca CTE Welding Area
Andrew and Derick on a jobsite
Andrew and Derick at a jobsite in Newport.
Dakota and Jimmie on a jobsite
Dakota and James at a jobsite in Garibaldi.

We are thrilled to announce a significant milestone: Andrew Adams and James Callister have earned the first nationally portable credentials for the NCCER Core from Tillamook Bay Community College. TBCC went to great lengths to help us refine and relaunch the OCJATC’s program as a Related Training Provider. They procured certifications, obtained grants, partnered with other community colleges, and established access to their training for our fellow OCJATC member’s Apprentices in Central Oregon.  Andrew and James have just completed their academic year in the program as Apprentices working on O’Brien’s coast projects. 

In addition to their accomplishments, David Weathers also just completed a first. To facilitate the delivery of this related training to our own Apprentices, he was hired by TBCC as an Adjunct Instructor. All the training was done at the newly constructed Nestucca CTE center (Career Technical Education ) where David over sought the build. This is his 2nd year leading instruction and supporting the growth of our Apprenticeship program.  As his full-time day job, he is also our most tenured Senior Superintendent and oversees all labor on the Coast. Thank you, David!

The 4-year Carpenter Apprenticeship requirements are 576 hours per year of related classroom training and a total of 8,000 hours of on-the-job. Andrew and James work each day, under the mentorship of a Journeyman Carpenter who oversees their on-the-job hours as defined by the BOLI standards.  They attend classes and study sessions in the evenings taught by a TBCC Instructor. Then attend in person Saturday labs, taught by David Weathers, where a project is built which focuses on the work processes required for that portion of the course. If that sounds like a bunch of extra work that they are all committed to, then you are correct…it is! Andrew has over 2,950 on-the-job hours as of last month and James has just over 1,000 since joining the program last September.

Andrew holds a special place in the heart of this program as he embarked on this journey with us during the initial year. His commitment was unwavering as the issues of a brand-new program were worked through and an accredited related training provider was secured. He even had to endure starting over with some of his coursework. Thank you, Andrew!

We want to extend our heartfelt congratulations to the entire team for their dedication and hard work in making this achievement possible. The goal of building a skilled workforce for the future is in our sites.

Andrew and Derick on a jobsite
Andrew and Derick at a jobsite in Newport.
Dakota and Jimmie on a jobsite
Dakota and James at a jobsite in Garibaldi.

We are thrilled to announce a significant milestone: Andrew Adams and James Callister have earned the first nationally portable credentials for the NCCER Core from Tillamook Bay Community College. TBCC went to great lengths to help us refine and relaunch the OCJATC’s program as a Related Training Provider. They procured certifications, obtained grants, partnered with other community colleges, and established access to their training for our fellow OCJATC member’s Apprentices in Central Oregon.  Andrew and James have just completed their academic year in the program as Apprentices working on O’Brien’s coast projects. 

In addition to their accomplishments, David Weathers also just completed a first. To facilitate the delivery of this related training to our own Apprentices, he was hired by TBCC as an Adjunct Instructor. All the training was done at the newly constructed Nestucca CTE center (Career Technical Education ) where David over sought the build. This is his 2nd year leading instruction and supporting the growth of our Apprenticeship program.  As his full-time day job, he is also our most tenured Senior Superintendent and oversees all labor on the Coast. Thank you, David!

The 4-year Carpenter Apprenticeship requirements are 576 hours per year of related classroom training and a total of 8,000 hours of on-the-job. Andrew and James work each day, under the mentorship of a Journeyman Carpenter who oversees their on-the-job hours as defined by the BOLI standards.  They attend classes and study sessions in the evenings taught by a TBCC Instructor. Then attend in person Saturday labs, taught by David Weathers, where a project is built which focuses on the work processes required for that portion of the course. If that sounds like a bunch of extra work that they are all committed to, then you are correct…it is! Andrew has over 2,950 on-the-job hours as of last month and James has just over 1,000 since joining the program last September.

Andrew holds a special place in the heart of this program as he embarked on this journey with us during the initial year. His commitment was unwavering as the issues of a brand-new program were worked through and an accredited related training provider was secured. He even had to endure starting over with some of his coursework. Thank you, Andrew!

We want to extend our heartfelt congratulations to the entire team for their dedication and hard work in making this achievement possible. The goal of building a skilled workforce for the future is in our sites.

Mackenzie Inc. and O’Brien are teaming up to tackle a big Design-Build housing project in Newport for Oregon State University (OSU). This new 77-unit building provides homes for students and professionals connected to the Hatfield Marine Science Center and helps to ease Newport’s housing crunch while expanding OSU’s coastal campus facilities.

Situated conveniently close to the Marine Science Center on Yaquina Bay, this housing spot is prime coastal real estate. But before construction could start, O’Brien’s team had to clear some existing small and scrubby trees from the site. It wasn’t smooth sailing though. Local mills didn’t want the trees because they thought they weren’t worth much and didn’t have the capacity to process them.

O’Brien’s team got resourceful and partnered with a habitat restoration company, Integrated Resource Management (IRC), and the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) through MidCoast Watersheds Council’s (MCWC) salvage log program. The team carefully coordinated with IRC and ODF for the tree removal process, providing over 120 trees – roots and all – from the OSU housing project site for sustainable reuse. The trees were sent to a nearby creek restoration project run by MCWC, which is a win for both the environment and the community.

MCWC has been doing this kind of restoration work for a long time – over 20 years, in fact. Their projects have used salvaged logs to spruce up streams, tidal channels, and floodplains, making life better for all sorts of species. These logs aren’t just wood; they’re homes for fish, helpers with flood control, and champions for healthy ecosystems. MCWC is always looking for like-minded volunteers and as a 501(c)(3) non-profit, donations to its efforts are tax deductible. With creative teamwork and a focus on sustainability, they’re making a difference in the Mid Coast watersheds.

And with projects like this new housing development at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center, it’s clear that taking care of the planet is a top priority for O’Brien’s team. Here’s to literally building a greener future! 🌍🏠

Shoutout to the project team! Dave Deardorff is the Project Manager, Meysha Lovrien of Lucas Design Build is the Assistant Project Manager, and Tony Gaines is the Superintendent. This is a collaboration effort between O’Brien and Lucas Design Build, which combined is called O’Brien Lucas Ventures.

Located along the banks of Tillamook Bay along scenic Highway 101 in Garibaldi, Oregon, Old Mill RV Resort is smack dab in the center of the best fishing, crabbing, kayaking, and mountain-biking trails in the Pacific Northwest.

With its mission to elevate the campground experience, Roam America recently embarked on a visionary renovation of this iconic coastal experience. Recognizing the park’s historical significance and its role as a cherished destination for RV travelers along the Pacific Coast, Roam America chose O’Brien’s Coast Team to upgrade existing amenities and build new facilities to elevate the guest experience to new heights.

The renovation project is designed to not only modernize the park’s infrastructure, but also to honor its rich heritage and natural surroundings, crafting a harmonious blend of tradition and innovation. O’Brien’s team is on the ground now, transforming the Old Mill RV Park into a premier destination for outdoor enthusiasts. The revitalized park is on a fast-track construction schedule for new state-of-the-art amenities including upgraded camping facilities and bathrooms; a remodeled and inviting clubhouse with kitchen, dining room, lounge area and sauna; as well as enhanced landscaping and expanded outdoor recreational areas ready to enjoy starting July 1st, 2024.

Mackenzie Inc. and O’Brien are teaming up to tackle a big Design-Build housing project in Newport for Oregon State University (OSU). This new 77-unit building provides homes for students and professionals connected to the Hatfield Marine Science Center and helps to ease Newport’s housing crunch while expanding OSU’s coastal campus facilities.

Situated conveniently close to the Marine Science Center on Yaquina Bay, this housing spot is prime coastal real estate. But before construction could start, O’Brien’s team had to clear some existing small and scrubby trees from the site. It wasn’t smooth sailing though. Local mills didn’t want the trees because they thought they weren’t worth much and didn’t have the capacity to process them.

O’Brien’s team got resourceful and partnered with a habitat restoration company, Integrated Resource Management (IRC), and the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) through MidCoast Watersheds Council’s (MCWC) salvage log program. The team carefully coordinated with IRC and ODF for the tree removal process, providing over 120 trees – roots and all – from the OSU housing project site for sustainable reuse. The trees were sent to a nearby creek restoration project run by MCWC, which is a win for both the environment and the community.

MCWC has been doing this kind of restoration work for a long time – over 20 years, in fact. Their projects have used salvaged logs to spruce up streams, tidal channels, and floodplains, making life better for all sorts of species. These logs aren’t just wood; they’re homes for fish, helpers with flood control, and champions for healthy ecosystems. MCWC is always looking for like-minded volunteers and as a 501(c)(3) non-profit, donations to its efforts are tax deductible. With creative teamwork and a focus on sustainability, they’re making a difference in the Mid Coast watersheds.

And with projects like this new housing development at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center, it’s clear that taking care of the planet is a top priority for O’Brien’s team. Here’s to literally building a greener future! 🌍🏠